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Table of Contents

 

 Unit 1 | Algebra

Page 1 | Expressions and Formulae

Page 2 | Index notation

Page 3| Solving Linear Equations

Page 4| Expanding and Factorising

Page 5| Factorising Quadratics and expanding double brackets

Page 6| Patterns and Sequences

Page 7| Simultaneous Equations

Page 8| Changing the subject of a Formula

Page 9| Adding , subtracting algebraic formulas

 Unit 2 |Graphs

Page 1 | Straight line graphs

Page 2 | Graphs of Quadratic functions

Unit 3 |Geometry and Measure

Page 1 | Transformations

Page 2 | Symmetry

Page 3 | Coordinates

Page 4 | Perimeter, Area, Volume

Page 5 | Circle geometry

Page 6 | Measurement

Page 7 | Trigonometry

Page 8 | Pythagoras

Page 9 | Angles

Page 10 | Shapes

Page 11| Time

Page 12 | Locus

Unit 4 | Numbers

Page 1 | Speed, Distance and time

Page 2 | Rounding and estimating

Page 3 | Ratio and proportion

Page 4 | Factors, Multiples and primes

Page 5 | Powers and roots

Page 6 | Decimals

Page 7 | Positive and negative numbers

Page 8 | Basic operations

Page 9 | Fractions

Page 10 | Percentages

Unit 5 | Statistics and Probability

Page 1 | Sampling data (MA)

Page 2 | Recording and representing data

Page 3 | Mean median range and mode

Page 4 | Standard deviation

Unit 4 | Calculus

Multiplying and Dividing by 10, 100 and 1000

1. Once you get the hang of it, multiplying and dividing by 10, 100 and 1000. All it involves is moving every digit either to the right or the left. It’s important that you remember how place value works though.

2. We’ll start with multiplication. When you multiply a number by 10, 100, or 1000, it’s getting bigger so all of the digits will have to move to the left.

3. You look at the number of zeros in what you’re multiplying to tell you how many spaces you need to move – when you’re multiplying by 100, it has two zeroes so you have to move two spaces to the left (by 10, its one space and by 1000, its three spaces).

 

Example 1:

Let’s say this is the question we have -> 263 x 100

 

We’re multiplying by 100 so this means that we’re going to be moving 2 spaces to the left. Let’s set this out in a place value chart.

 

10-100-1000-example1

 

There was nothing left in the tens and the units columns so we had to put a zero in there. Our answer is 26 300.

 

4.  Dividing by 10, 100 or 1000 is very similar to multiplying but this time, all the digits in the place value chart will be moving to the right, because they’re getting smaller.

 

5. Like with multiplication, the number of zeros in what you’re dividing by tells you how many spaces you need to move – dividing by 10 is one space to the right, by 100 is two and by 1000 is three.

 

Example 2:

Let’s say our next question is 840 ÷ 1000

We’re dividing by 1000 so that means we have to move 3 spaces to the right. We’ll use the place value chart to do this again.

 

10-100-1000-example2

 

Our answer is 0.840 but we can just write this as 0.84.

 

6. These methods of multiplying and dividing can be useful even when your question has multiples of 10 or 100 or 1000. You just have to break up the question – for example if you have 25 x 30, you can change this to 25 x 3 x 10. You can find out that 25 x 3 is 75 the you just have to multiply 75 x 10.

 

7. Similarly, you can break up division questions. If you had 360 ÷ 40 , we know that 40 is the same as 4 x 10 so we can do 360 ÷ 4, which is 90, then divide that by 10.

 

1) Complete the questions

question1 question2 question3 question4 question5

 

2) What number is 10 times larger than 7.1?box

 

3) How many times smaller is 39 than 3900?box

 

4) Each many question will he have constructed in 100 days?

How many question will he have constructed n 100 days?

 

5) Johns grandfather splits a 2.5kg bag of flour into 10 containers.

question6

 

6) A schools is holding a harvest fund raiser. Each child has asked to bling in
15 different item sot food.

There are 125 children in the school.

How much food will there be in total?

 

 

 

 

 

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