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Student Voice: How can Governments make Reforms but not Consult Students?

 

 

 

Governments across the UK have educational reforms, but how much have they consulted students aged 11 to 18 on reform matters?

 

Students need a voice; they need to be represented fairly in crucial  educational changes that are happening and effect them.  Teachers have one perspective, students have another and governments have a third perspective.

 

 

Governments say, “We believe making GCSEs and A levels more rigorous will prepare students properly for life after school.

 

“We need to address literacy standards in schools and make sure pupils develop good reading skills early,” politicians add. But how much are politicians listening to he pupils?

 

 

Overbearing politicians direct some research,  look at data, but do they really understand the reality of the classroom and the schools daily life? A school in an inner city London will have very different factors of consideration that school in Cambridge so student perspectives can vary too.

 

Students across geographical locations need a voice, not only in the limited boundaries of the classroom, but beyond the boundaries of the school – I mean nationally.

 

Let’s not be naive, if we listen and understand learning better from the eyes  of the child then we can remove many of the barriers to learning for students, innovate lessons using the democratic education tool – that’s how student voice can contribute.

 

Faheem Hussain is Business Strategist for Improve Tuition online tutoring worldwide across the globe.