Menu

Table of Contents

 

 Unit 1 | Algebra

Page 1 | Expressions and Formulae

Page 2 | Index notation

Page 3| Solving Linear Equations

Page 4| Expanding and Factorising

Page 5| Factorising Quadratics and expanding double brackets

Page 6| Patterns and Sequences

Page 7| Simultaneous Equations

Page 8| Changing the subject of a Formula

Page 9| Adding , subtracting algebraic formulas

 Unit 2 |Graphs

Page 1 | Straight line graphs

Page 2 | Graphs of Quadratic functions

Unit 3 |Geometry and Measure

Page 1 | Transformations

Page 2 | Symmetry

Page 3 | Coordinates

Page 4 | Perimeter, Area, Volume

Page 5 | Circle geometry

Page 6 | Measurement

Page 7 | Trigonometry

Page 8 | Pythagoras

Page 9 | Angles

Page 10 | Shapes

Page 11| Time

Page 12 | Locus

Unit 4 | Numbers

Page 1 | Speed, Distance and time

Page 2 | Rounding and estimating

Page 3 | Ratio and proportion

Page 4 | Factors, Multiples and primes

Page 5 | Powers and roots

Page 6 | Decimals

Page 7 | Positive and negative numbers

Page 8 | Basic operations

Page 9 | Fractions

Page 10 | Percentages

Unit 5 | Statistics and Probability

Page 1 | Sampling data (MA)

Page 2 | Recording and representing data

Page 3 | Mean median range and mode

Page 4 | Standard deviation

Unit 4 | Calculus

Table of Contents

 

Algebra | Unit 1 | Expressions and Formula

Page 1 | Writing Formula

Page 2 | Solving Formula

Page 3| Changing the Subject of a Formula

Algebra | Unit 2 | Inequalities

Page 1 | Number Lines

Page 2 | Solving Inequalities

Algebra | Unit 3 | Equations

Page 1 | Solving Equations

Page 2 | Equations with Brackets

Page 3 | Equations with Fractions

Algebra | Unit 4 | Graphs

Page 1 | Straight Line Graphs ( y = mx + c )

Algebra | Unit 5 | Patterns and Sequences

Page 1 | Basic Patterns

Page 2 | Linear Sequences & nth term

Page 3 | Quadratic Equations

Shape, Space and Measure | Unit 1 |Transformations

Page 1 | Congruent Shapes

Page 2 | Translations

Page 3 | Rotations

Page 4 | Reflections

Page 5 | Enlargements

Shape, Space and Measure | Unit 2 |Symmetry

Page 1 | Line Symmetry

Page 2 | Rotational Symmetry

Shape, Space and Measure | Unit 2 |Coordinates

Page 1 | Plotting Coordinates

Shape, Space and Measure | Unit 3 |Perimeter, Area, Volume

Shape, Space and Measure | Unit 4 |Measurement

Page 1 | Estimation and Accuracy

Page 2 | Scales

Page 3 | Conversions (Metric & Imperial)

Page 4 | Area and Volume Unit Conversions

Shape, Space and Measure | Unit 5 |Trigonometry

Page 1 | Triangle Construction

Shape, Space and Measure | Unit 6 |Pythagoras

Page 1 | Pythagoras Theorem

Page 2 | Line Segments

Shape, Space and Measure | Unit 7 |Angles

Page 1 | Summary of Drawing  &Reading Angles

Page 2 | Angle Sum in Different Shapes

Page 3 | Angles in a Polygon

Page 4 | Angles and Parallel Lines

Page 5 | Perpendicular Bisectors

Page 6 | Angle Bisectors

Page 7 | Constructing Loci

Shape, Space and Measure | Unit 8 |Shapes

Page 1 | Properties of Circles

Page 2 | Properties of Polygons

Page 3 | Properties of Triangles

Page 4 | 3D Shapes: Nets & Faces

Shape, Space and Measure | Unit 8 |Time

Page 1 | Units of Time

Page 2 | 12 & 24 Hour Clocks

Page 3 | Timetables

Number | Unit 1 |Place Value

Number | Unit 2 |Distance, Speed and Time

Number | Unit 3 |Rounding and estimating

Number | Unit 4 |Ratio and Proportion

Page 1 | Equivalent Ratios

Page 2 | Division with Ratios

Page 3 | Scale Drawings & Maps

Page 4 | Proportions

Number | Unit 5 |Primer numbers, factors and multiples

Number | Unit 6 |Powers and roots

Number | Unit 7 |Decimals

Page 1 | X 10, 100 & 1000

Page 2 | ÷10, 100 & 1000

Page 3 | Multiplying and Dividing by Whole Numbers

Number | Unit 8 |Positive and negative numbers

Page 1 | Operations with Positive and Negative Numbers

Number | Unit 9 |Operations

Page 1 | BIDMAS Rule

Page 2 | Multiplication & Division (Different Methods)

Page 3 | Converting Fractions, Decimals & Percentages

Number | Unit 10 |Fractions

Page 1 | Equivalent Fractions

Page 2 | Simplifying Fractions

Page 3 | Mixed Numbers

Page 4 | Improper Fractions

Page 5 | Ordering Fractions

Page 6 | Addition & Subtraction

Page 7 | Multiplication & Division

Number | Unit 11 |Percentages

Page 1 | Percentages of Quantities

Page 2 | Interest, Wages & Quantities

Number | Unit 12 |Standard Index form

Page 1 | Decimals in Standard Form

Page 2 | Writing in Standard Form

Page 3 | Addition and Subtraction un Standard Form

Page 4 | Multiplication and Division in Standard Form

Handling Data | Unit 1 |Collecting & Recording Data Representing Data

Page 1 | Tables & Tally Diagrams

Page 2 | Frequency Tables

Page 3 | Stem & Leaf Diagrams

Handling Data | Unit 2 |Representing Data 

Page 1 | Bar Charts

Page 2 | Line Graphs

Page 3 | Pictograms

Page 4 | Frequency Polygons

Page 5 | Scatter Diagrams

Page 6 | Pie Charts

Handling Data | Unit 2 |Averages

Page 1 | Mean, Median, Mode & Range

Page 2 | Averages of Grouped Data

Handling Data | Unit 2 |Probability

Page 1 | Basic Probability

Page 2 | Sum of Probabilities

Page 3 | Probability of Combined Events

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Division Calculations


Knowing your times tables is very useful when dividing – since division is the inverse of multiplication.  For simpler questions, you may want to use certain mental methods when dividing.

Example 1:

If you’re dividing by slightly difficult number, you can break it down to make it easier.

Let’s say that the question is 112 ÷ 14

14 might be difficult to divide by mentally but, we know that 2 x 7 = 14. So, what we can do is divide 112 by 2 first, which is 56. Then we can divide 56 by 7 which is 8.

By breaking it down, the question became much easier and we now know that 112 ÷ 14 = 8.

If a number doesn’t divide completely, you may end up with a remainder at the end. For example, 12÷ 5 wouldn’t fit fully so the answer would be 2 remainder 2, because 2 fives fit into 12 with 2 left over.

With decimals, the way to divide is very similar to the method used in multiplication. You multiply it by 10 or 100 to get a whole number, do the division, then divide your answer by what you multiplied in the beginning.

Example 2:

Let’s say our question is 5.4 ÷ 9

We multiply 5.4 by 10 to get 54.

54 ÷ 9 = 6

We then divide 6 by 10 to get 0.6     à    5.4 ÷ 9 = 0.6

For more complicated division questions, you might want to use a written method such as long division. This involves subtracting multiples of the number you are dividing by.

Example 3:

Let’s say the question is 476 ÷ 19. This is how it would look in long division style.

divide-remainderdivide-example3

1) Circle the question which have the answer 3

18÷6                 27÷9                      44÷11

21÷3                       45÷9

2) Add in the missing value

72÷box= 6

3) Laura writes a number on paper.She tells James to attend at guessing the number she gives him clue saying. If i divide the number by 9 if equals 13.

What is the number on the paper?box

4)

1328 ÷ 4 =box

5) 7 × 28 = 196

Use this to calculate 196 ÷ 28 =box

6) At a supermarket, a bag can carry a maximum of 6 items. There are 72 items. How many bags can Robert fill?box

7) Sams tutor has challenged him to work out

288÷16        288÷2=144            144÷18=8

How can use these two expressions to calculate the answer.

8) A cricket club is travelling to match. there are 17 people on the team.Each can carry 4 people.How many caws will we need?box

9) Write the missing signs.

54 ÷9 = 36 ÷box

 

1 2 3 4 5 6  


“Failure is not an option for me. 
Success is all I envisioned.”

++44 (0)1924 506010