Menu

Table of Contents

 

 Unit 1 | Algebra

Page 1 | Expressions and Formulae

Page 2 | Index notation

Page 3| Solving Linear Equations

Page 4| Expanding and Factorising

Page 5| Factorising Quadratics and expanding double brackets

Page 6| Patterns and Sequences

Page 7| Simultaneous Equations

Page 8| Changing the subject of a Formula

Page 9| Adding , subtracting algebraic formulas

 Unit 2 |Graphs

Page 1 | Straight line graphs

Page 2 | Graphs of Quadratic functions

Unit 3 |Geometry and Measure

Page 1 | Transformations

Page 2 | Symmetry

Page 3 | Coordinates

Page 4 | Perimeter, Area, Volume

Page 5 | Circle geometry

Page 6 | Measurement

Page 7 | Trigonometry

Page 8 | Pythagoras

Page 9 | Angles

Page 10 | Shapes

Page 11| Time

Page 12 | Locus

Unit 4 | Numbers

Page 1 | Speed, Distance and time

Page 2 | Rounding and estimating

Page 3 | Ratio and proportion

Page 4 | Factors, Multiples and primes

Page 5 | Powers and roots

Page 6 | Decimals

Page 7 | Positive and negative numbers

Page 8 | Basic operations

Page 9 | Fractions

Page 10 | Percentages

Unit 5 | Statistics and Probability

Page 1 | Sampling data (MA)

Page 2 | Recording and representing data

Page 3 | Mean median range and mode

Page 4 | Standard deviation

Unit 4 | Calculus

Money


Money problems are very similar to normal maths problems, but it’s easy to get tripped up by mixing up pounds and pence. It is important to always convert to all in pence or all in pounds.

Example 1:

Ellie’s mum sends her to the shop to pick up some groceries.

She buys a pack of tomatoes for £1.56, a pint of milk for 85p and a box of her favourite cereal for £2.99.

How much will this cost at the till?’

We can find the answer to this question by changing all of the prices to pounds or all of the prices to pence, then doing column addition

money-example1

OR

money-example2

 

 

1 2 3 4 5 6  


“How bad 
do you want it?”

++44 (0)1924 506010